• Environment

    UK aviation can accommodate significant growth to 2050 without a substantial increase in absolute CO2 emissions.

  • Economy

    The aviation sector contributes around £18 billion per annum of economic output to the UK economy.

  • Economy

    Goods worth £116 billion are shipped by air between the UK and non-EU countries, representing 35% of the UK’s extra-EU trade by value.

  • Tax

    The UK has the highest levels of tax on air passengers in the world, raising over £3 billion a year for the Government.

BATA responds to Air Passenger Duty proposals for Scotland

BATA responds to Air Passenger Duty proposals for Scotland

Reacting to the Smith Commission’s recommendation that Air Passenger Duty (APD) be devolved to the Scottish Government, Nathan Stower, Chief Executive of the British Air Transport Association, said: “We share the Scottish Government’s analysis that Air Passenger Duty – the world’s highest air passenger tax – acts as a barrier to trade, tourism and economic growth. APD across the UK should be phased out as quickly as possible, because the damage caused by this tax doesn’t stop at the Scottish border.” Read more

Britain deserves a break – call to scrap tax on family flights

Britain deserves a break – call to scrap tax on family flights

A campaign to scrap the tax on children’s flights launches today (24th November), as polling reveals that that the majority of the public think that it is time the Government make children under 12 exempt from Air Passenger Duty (APD)– and help support families in taking valuable holidays together. Read more

View from the Chief Executive – September 2014

“Britain’s airlines strive for the very highest levels of punctuality for their passengers. While the latest figures for UK airports show a slight decline in performance compared with the same period for 2013, the first three months of 2014 saw the best first quarter results since records began. We will continue to work with our airport partners to eradicate unnecessary delays and look after passengers when things do go wrong.” Read more